Here’s each state’s status in regard to the White House exit strategy for COVID-19

The spread in the states

Using criteria provided by the White House, analysts at Covidexitstrategy.org are tracking each state’s progress in reducing symptoms and case numbers and conducting testing.

The group of public health and crisis experts includes members from the U.S. Digital Response and Duke University’s Margolis Center for Health Policy and has built the website to track each state’s progress toward stopping the spread of COVID-19. Members of the team have experience working at the White House, Department of Health and Human Services and on the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, the website says.

The group says a downward trajectory of illness reported and of documented cases is critical. So far, not many states have a downward trend, but several are getting close.

According to Covidexitstrategy.com, the use of accurate, real-time data to inform decision-making is essential for infectious disease control. To fill in information gaps across states and provide useful and actionable COVID-19-related data, all states should update their COVID data portals to meet basic minimum standards, including reporting on essential indicators, the analysts says. The data below is a subset of the data states should report regularly.

This map and chart below highlight how each state is doing in regards to symptoms and cases to give an idea of how the disease is spreading.

State by state as of July 29:

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Tata Capital Growth Fund to invest Rs 225 Crore in Biocon Biologics

Bengaluru, Jul 31: Biocon Ltd, a global
Biopharmaceuticals company, announced on Friday that the board of its subsidiary Biocon Biologics India Limited has approved a primary equity investment by Tata Capital Growth Fund.
As per the terms of the proposed agreement, Tata Capital will invest Rs 225 crore for a 0.85 per cent minority stake in the biosimilar business, valuing Biocon Biologics at an equity valuation of Rs 26,250 crore and an enterprise valuation of Rs 30,400 crore, Biocon said in a statement.
The transaction is subject to standard condition precedents and approvals.
Post the completion of this transaction, Biocon will hold 95.25 per cent stake in Biocon Biologics, the company added.
Dr Christiane Hamacher, CEO, Biocon Biologics, said, “This equity infusion is the next step in our journey of unlocking value. Through prudent investments in R&D and high- quality manufacturing infrastructure we are confident of achieving our aspiration of serving 5 million patients through our biosimilars portfolio and achieving a target revenue of USD one billion in FY22.”
Akhil Awasthi, Managing Partner, Tata Growth PE, said, “The investment brings together 150 plus years of brand equity of Tatas and a very strong R&D based entrepreneur in Dr Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw.” (PTI)

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Fauci optimistic COVID-19 vaccine will be widely available

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Matthew Perrone | The Associated Press

Once a coronavirus vaccine is approved as safe and effective, Americans should have widespread access within a reasonable time, Dr. Anthony Fauci assured lawmakers Friday.

Appearing before a House panel investigating the nation’s response to the pandemic, Fauci expressed “cautious” optimism that a vaccine would be available, particularly by next year.

“I believe, ultimately, over a period of time in 2021, that Americans will be able to get it,” Fauci said, referring to the vaccine.

There will be a priority list for who gets early vaccinations. “I don’t think we will have everybody getting it immediately,” Fauci explained.

But “ultimately, within a reasonable time, the plans allow for any American who needs the vaccine to get it,” he added.

Under direction from the White House, federal health authorities are carrying out a plan dubbed Operation Warp Speed to manufacture 300 million doses of a vaccine on a compressed timeline.

Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease official, said a quarter-million people have expressed interest in taking part in studies of experimental vaccines for the coronavirus.

He said that 250,000 people have registered on a government website to take part in vaccine trials, which are pivotal for establishing safety and effectiveness. Not all patients who volunteer to take part in clinical trials are eligible to participate.

Fauci was joined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention head Dr. Robert Redfield and Health and Human Services testing czar Adm. Brett Giroir.

Giroir acknowledged that it’s currently not possible for the U.S. to return all coronavirus test results to patients in two to three days. He blamed overwhelming demand across the nation.

Many health experts say that COVID-19 results are almost worthless when delivered after two or three days because by then the window for contact tracing has closed.

The latest government data shows about 75% of testing results are coming back within five days, but the remainder are taking longer, Giroir told lawmakers.

Rapid, widespread testing is critical to containing the coronavirus outbreak, but the U.S. effort has been plagued by supply shortages and backlogs since the earliest days of the outbreak.

At a time when early progress seems to have been lost and uncertainty clouds the nation’s path forward, Fauci, Giroir and Redfield are calling on calling on Americans to go back to public health basics such as social distancing and wearing masks.

The panel, the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis, is divided about how to reopen schools and businesses, mirroring divisions among Americans. Committee Chairman Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., said the White House must come up with a comprehensive national plan to contain the virus. Ranking Republican Steve Scalise of Louisiana said the Trump administration has plans already on vaccines, testing, nursing homes and other coronavirus-related issues.

A rebound of cases across the South and the West has dashed hopes for a quick return to normal life. Problems with the availability and timeliness of testing continue to be reported. And the race for a vaccine, though progressing rapidly, has yet to deliver a breakthrough.

Fauci’s public message in recent days has been that Americans can’t afford a devil-may-care attitude toward COVID-19 and need to double down on basic measures such as wearing masks in public, keeping their distance from others and avoiding crowds and indoor spaces such as bars. That’s echoed by Redfield and Giroir, though they are far less prominent.

Fauci’s dogged persistence has drawn the ire of some of President Donald Trump’s supporters and prompted a new round of calls for his firing. But the veteran of battles against AIDS and Ebola has stuck to his message, while carefully avoiding open confrontations with the Trump White House.

In an interview with The Associated Press earlier this week, Fauci said he was “disturbed” by the flat-out opposition in parts of the country to wearing masks as a public health protective measure.

“There are certain fundamentals,” he said, “the staples of what you need to do … one is universal wearing of masks.”

Public health experts say masks help prevent an infected person who has yet to develop symptoms from passing the virus to others. For mask wearers, there’s also some evidence that they can offer a degree of protection from an infected person nearby.

Fauci said in his AP interview that he’s concerned because the U.S. has not followed the track of Asian and European nations also hit hard by the coronavirus.

Other countries that shut down their economies knocked back uncontrolled spread and settled into a pattern of relatively few new cases, although they continued to experience local outbreaks.

The U.S. also knocked back the initial spread, but it never got the background level of new cases quite as low. And the resurgence of COVID-19 in the Sunbelt in recent weeks has driven the number of new daily cases back up into the 60,000-70,000 range. It coincided with economic reopening and a return to social gatherings, particularly among younger adults. Growing numbers of emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths have followed as grim consequences.

Nearly 4.5 million Americans have been infected since the start of the pandemic, and more than 150,000 have died, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Fauci said there’s evidence the surge across the South may be peaking, but upticks in the Midwest are now a concern.

“They’ve really got to jump all over that because if they don’t then you might see the surge we saw in some of the Southern states,” he told the AP.

Though Fauci gets push-back from White House officials, other medical experts in the administration are on the same page when it comes to the public health message.

Giroir, the testing czar, told reporters Thursday: “I think it’s very important to make sure that we all spread the public health message that we can control all the outbreaks occurring right now.”

He said controlling the outbreaks will require people to wear masks, avoid crowded indoor spaces and wash their hands frequently.

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Shiv Sena leaders addressing a press conference at Jammu on Friday.

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Edited, Printed, Published by Kamal Rohmetra and owned by Excelsior. Executive Editor Neeraj Rohmetra. Printed at Excelsior Printer Pvt Ltd, Janipura, Jammu and published from EXCELSIOR HOUSE, Janipura, Jammu 180007 (J&K).
Phones: +91-191 2537055, +91-1912537901, +91-191 2539178. Fax: +91-191-2537831
Daily Excelsior Srinagar office: 2 Partap Park Srinagar Phones:+91-194 2450213

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Sparks learning how to prepare for late-night starts

In a typical WNBA season, 10 o’clock at night would represent the end of game day for most players. Maybe they would be finishing a post-game meal, or perhaps laying down to get some sleep before the next day’s practice.

But not in 2020, the year of the WNBA’s Florida bubble. With a condensed season and teams sharing a limited number of arenas, 10 p.m. can be the local tip-off time, as it was Thursday for the Sparks’ 81-76 win over the Sun. And in those cases, players have to figure out a new way to navigate game day.

“I think it really is finding a new routine, a new way to prepare yourself,” Sparks head coach Derek Fisher said.

Of the Sparks’ 19 remaining games this season, 13 of them will start at 8 p.m. or later on the East Coast, like Saturday’s 8 p.m start against the Seattle Storm (5 p.m. PT). Four are scheduled for 10 p.m., meaning the game will end around midnight.

“I usually go to bed around 10 o’clock, so it’s kinda like my bedtime but I’m just trying to make the best of it,” Sparks forward Kristine Anigewe said.

Anigwe’s current strategy is to try to go to bed earlier this night before a game. The idea is that if she wakes up early on game day, it provides her with more time to take a nap prior to tip-off so she’s fresh for the game.

But this has its own potential pitfalls, as Fisher notes.

“Sometimes you can get too much sleep or take a nap in the afternoon,” he explained, “and it can end up being too long and you’re just sluggish after that no matter what you try to do.”

Some figure quality of sleep is the answer. Forward Candace Parker ordered her own mattress to be delivered to the bubble. Once it arrives, she figures it will be an improvement.

Beyond just making sure they are rested, players must find the right schedule to do their typical pre-game routines.

Veteran Seimone Augustus likes to do a stretching activation or yoga before each game. She’s still trying to figure out how that fits into later starts.

“It’s a long period of time throughout the day,” she said. “We have COVID testing, then shootaround, and then it’s about three or four hours or so before we play a game. So it’s just mainly trying to figure out your regimen and routine.”

And then Sparks players have to figure out their meal schedule. Eat too early, and you risk being hungry when the game starts. Too late, and it’s difficult to play a full basketball game.

With all these irregularities, some players are finding they can’t get away with certain foods. Guard Chelsea Gray had to switch up her pre-game meal this week after her choice prior to Tuesday’s loss to Chicago affected her performance.

“I think it was a lot of different spices going on that I don’t know if it was salty, but I just felt drained and not having my legs under me a little bit,” Gray said. “All that is important.”

Added Fisher, “There will be some nights where a couple players just don’t have it, and that’s why everybody else needs to be able to bring it every time we get a chance.”

Storm (2-1) vs. Sparks (2-1)

When: 5 p.m. PT

Where: IMG Academy, Bradenton, Florida

TV: CBS Sports Network, Spectrum SportsNet

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Amazon closer to launching satellites, upping internet reach

NEW YORK: Amazon.Com is one step closer to space.

The company received Government approval to put more than 3,200 satellites into orbit with the goal of beaming internet service to earth.

Amazon said the satellites could provide internet to parts of the world that don’t have it. It could also become a new business for Amazon, selling internet service to people or companies.

“We have heard so many stories lately about people who are unable to do their job or complete schoolwork because they don’t have reliable internet at home,” said Amazon executive Dave Limp, in a written statement.

Amazon said it will spend USD 10 billion on the initiative, called Project Kuiper. It’s opening a research facility in Redmond, Washington, where the satellites will be designed and tested.

That would be about twice the profit that the Seattle company made in its most recent three-month financial reporting period.

Other companies have already put satellites into orbit, including SpaceX, the rocket company owned by Tesla CEO Elon Musk. SpaceX received government approval for the project in 2018.

Space is a major focus of Amazon’s founder and CEO Jeff Bezos, the world’s richest man. He privately owns a space exploration company and has spoken of, at some point in the distant future, the potential of relocating manufacturing and other heavy industries to space, keeping the resulting emissions out of the earth’s atmosphere.

Amazon didn’t say when it expects to have Project Kuiper operating, but the Federal Communications Commission, which approved the initiative on Thursday, said half of its satellites must be in orbit by July 2026. (AGENCIES)

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Immigration, wildfires, drug cartels: 3 powerhouse new documentaries you need to see

In Netflix’s new documentary series “Immigration Nation,” the filmmakers won unprecedented access to the inner workings of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, showing how ICE agents do their jobs as well as the toll of their work on immigrant and refugee families.

The Ron Howard-directed “Rebuilding Paradise” from National Geographic Documentary Films tracks the devastating impact of the Camp Fire on Paradise, California as its residents struggle to recover over the year that followed that November 2018 wildfire.

“The Last Narc,” a four-part docuseries on Amazon Prime, tells the story of the 1985 murder of DEA Agent Kiki Camarena by the Guadalajara cartel, posing the disturbing question of what the CIA knew and did or did not about that crime.

All three documentaries have strong connections to California viewers given the impact of the topics they explore. Though difficult viewing at times, this is serious journalism well worth your time as they premiere this weekend.

Here’s what we learned as we reviewed these three new documentaries:

‘Rebuilding Paradise’

The first 10 minutes of “Rebuilding Paradise” are as apocalyptic as any dystopian feature film you’ve ever seen, all the more terrifying for the fact that what you’re watching is absolutely real.

Set to a soundtrack of radio fire warnings, emergency broadcasts and the voices of residents fleeing Paradise as it’s consumed by swirling storms of fire, it’s a genuinely uncomfortable introduction to director Ron Howard’s documentary film for National Geographic.

“How far out is the first?” you hear a resident ask an official outside the Paradise hospital as it was being evacuated on Nov. 8, 2018.

“It’s everywhere; we’re 100 percent surrounded by fire,” the official replies.

“Are we going to die?” comes another voice, this time almost a whisper.

The Camp Fire, as this catastrophe is known, is the deadliest and most expensive wildfire in California history, killing at least 85 people and almost completely burning Paradise off the map.

“Rebuilding Paradise” tells the story of the town from the day of the fire through a year of rebuilding, following a handful of residents as they struggle to regain a sense of home again in a place many had lived all their lives.

“I went from being the town drunk to being the town’s mayor,” says Woody Culleton, who we follow as he works to build a house to replace the one that burned. “This is a place where everything came together for me and in a day it was gone.”

Police officer Matt Gates serves as another of the film’s characters, his good humor in the face of adversity a refreshing break. “I know it’s cliche, but the donut shop was right back there,” he says as he drives his cruiser through town.

School superintendent Michelle John and her husband Phil are two of the heroes that emerge, working with the district staff to get the kids of Paradise back in school — at first in remote locations, but finally and triumphantly for graduation on the high school’s football field.

There’s a lot of anger expressed at Pacific Gas & Electric, which accepted responsibility for its equipment sparking the fire, and discussions of the inherent danger of living in such a beautiful wooded place as climate change makes wildfires both stronger and more common.

That note of climate danger sounds again in a touching way at the end of the film as students at the high school collection donations for victims of an Alabama tornado, seeing in that new tragedy a mirror of themselves.

“Rebuilding Paradise” opens in live and virtual theaters on Friday, July 31. Go to rebuildingparadise.film for more.

‘Immigration Nation’

One of the most remarkable things about this six-part docuseries is that it got made at all, given how restrictive ICE is about granting access to its officers and detainees alike. In fact, the agency came to regret the access it approved in 2017, attempting to block the release or force changes in the episodes once they saw what the series contained.

Married filmmakers Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau embedded with agents as ICE implemented Trump Administration changes such as separating parents from their minor children at the border — and locking up both adults and kids — and deporting any eligible immigrant instead of prioritizing those with criminal records over those without.

As a result, they witnessed ICE agents in the field and in the offices working with never-ending caseloads of immigrants and refugees. Most appear as professionals struggling to set their personal feelings aside to do their job, but the cameras at times capture scenes of questionable behavior. An officer picks a lock to gain access to an immigrant’s apartment building.

At one point a supervisor tells a field office to bring in more immigrants no matter who they are or what he has to do. “I don’t care what you do, but bring at least two people,” he says, prompting the field agent to tell the filmmakers “That’s a pretty (bleeping) stupid thing to say” in front of their cameras.

Filmmakers also gained unprecedented access to detainees in ICE custody and were able to follow them over months as they wait for a resolution to their immigration status.

The most heartwrenching of these comes in multiple interviews with fathers who’d been separated from their children at the border with no idea where they’d been taken.

“In this country, it’s like I’m no longer a father,” says Bernardo Arévalo, weeping as he talks about his teen son being taken from him at the border.

Most of the ICE personnel explain their ability to do their jobs as enforcing the law or simply following orders from above. Not thinking whether that’s justice is baked into the system, says Becca Heller, the director of the International Refugee Assistance Project, early in the series.

“Is a government agency evil? No. Is every single person inside ICE evil? No,” Heller says. “The brilliance of the system is that their job has been siphoned off in such a way that maybe what they see day to day seems justified, but when you add it up, all of the people just doing their job, it becomes this crazy terrorizing system.”

“Immigration Nation” premieres on Netflix on Monday, Aug. 3

‘The Last Narc’

The kidnapping, torture and murder of DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena represented a shocking escalation of the War on Drugs when it occurred in 1985. The Guadalajara cartel now seemed to be taking aim at U.S. law enforcement officers, not just their criminal rivals.

Director Tiller Russell’s four-part docuseries on Amazon Prime takes a new look at the notorious murder and questions whether the full truth has yet to be revealed. For while a handful of Mexican citizens were tried and convicted of the crimes, “The Last Narc” alleges that higher powers including the CIA had some involvement in the crime or the cover-up.

The series features a colorful and credible-sounding protagonist in Hector Berrellez, a longtime, decorated DEA agent who worked with Camarena, led the investigation into his murder, and eventually came to believe a cover-up had taken place.

“I’ve kind of had this little thorn in my heart knowing the truth about what really happened to Kiki,” Berrellez alleges earlier in the series. “That U.S. intelligence officials ordered the kidnapping and interrogation of Kiki Camarena.

“The Camarena case is still being covered up to this day,” he continues. “And I want the world to know the truth. It’s time. And if I die doing it, well, that’s what God wanted.”

Berrellez hasn’t been shy about his beliefs on the topic in recent years, but the film not only brings in other U.S. officials to vouch for his seriousness, but it also scores interviews with three former Jalisco State Police officials, all who had been working for the cartel, whom Berrellez flipped to provide testimony into the Camarena murder.

Their interviews are chilling and dramatic as they describe what happened in tones that range from matter-of-fact to anguish and guilt.

Camarena met his wife, Geneva “Mika” Camarena, in high school in Calexico, and her interviews add a touching reminder that he was a person much loved by his family and friends who feel his loss to this day.

“The Last Narc” premieres on Amazon Prime on Friday, July 31.

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Army foils infiltration bid along LoC

SRINAGAR: The Army on Friday foiled an infiltration bid by militants along the Line of Control in Macchil sector, a defence spokesman said here.

Alert troops noticed suspicious movement 600 metres into the Indian side along the LoC in Kupwara district around 3 am, the spokesman said.

He said the militants were intercepted, leading to a firefight.

“After the first light, a search was carried out during which a trail of blood was found,” the spokesman said.

He said three AK rifles, a sniper rifle, eight grenades and other “war-like stores” were seized from the scene of the gunbattle.

A combing operation was going on in the area when the reports last came in. (AGENCIES)

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Morning Wrap: Full coverage from Lakers-Clippers thriller; Angels, Dodgers going in different directions; Whicker pays tribute to legendary Mike Gillespie

The Morning Wrap shares the days top five stories from our reporters at the Southern California Newspaper Group … And have everything delivered to you in our daily newsletters

ONE: The Lakers and Clippers opener in Orlando to restart the NBA was what everyone expected, a slugfest that came down to a last second shot, the Clippers’ Paul George missing a game-winning 3-pointer, allowing the Lakers to walk off with a 103-101 victory, writes Kyle Goon.

Clippers reporter Mirjam Swanson wrote about how the two teams joined together for a moment of unity and protest, and columnist Jim Alexander writes how L.A. fans might feel a little robbed not having the Hallway game or the playoffs a few months ago in Staples Center — but it was still entertaining.

TWO: With slugger Mike Trout out on maternity leave, the Angels slow start in the 60-game sprint continued in an 8-5 loss to the Seattle Mariners, writes Jeff Fletcher, the Angels’ fifth loss in their first first seven games.

THREE: A.J. Pollock brought some power with a two-run homer and a double, and the Dodgers came away with a 6-3 victory over Arizona for their third straight win after sweeping Houston two straight. For Pollock, it’s been quite a journey.

Reporter J.P. Hoornstra writes: One week after spring training was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pollock began what he called a “wild ride.” His daughter, Maddi Mae, was born prematurely. In June, he tested positive for COVID-19. It wasn’t until last Saturday that his daughter was allowed to come home, 128 days into her young life.

FOUR: Columnist Mark Whicker writes a wonderful tribute for Mike Gillespi, who played and coached baseball at USC, passing away recently at 78. Whicker writes: “The four stages go like this: Middle age, old age, “Hey, you look good,” and legend. When Mike Gillespie took off the uniform, he was 78. The breakthroughs and the heartbreaks were sprawled behind him, on roadsides.”

Whicker: Mike Gillespie’s fun and fire spanned baseball generations

FIVE: Baldwin Park football and soccer player Jorge Lizarraga, 18, had just graduated and thought of joining the army or playing sports for a community college, his coaches say. But on Wednesday, Lizarraga died in a horrific car accident, and his coaches and friend who was with him that day, speak of how quick life can be taken away, and what a fun person he was. Students, friends and his family held a vigil on Thursday near the scene of the accident.

  • Jorge Lizarraga, 18, who played varsity football and soccer at Baldwin Park High School, died in a July 30, 2020 crash on Baldwin Park Boulevard in Baldwin Park. A second man was also killed in the collision. (Photo courtesy of Baldwin Park High School)

  • Candles are lit in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Soccer players gather for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Soccer teammates place candles in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

  • Friends, teammates and the community join for a vigil in memory of Baldwin Park football and soccer player, Jorge Lizarraga, at the intersection of Baldwin Park Blvd. and La Rica Ave. on Thursday July 30, 2020. Lizarraga died in a car accident at the center divider Wednesday night. (Photo by Keith Durflinger, Contributing Photographer)

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Biz with turnover above Rs 500 cr to generate e-invoice for B2B transactions

NEW DELHI: Businesses with turnover of Rs 500 crore and above will generate all B2B invoices on a centralised Government portal starting October 1.

The Central Board of Indirect Taxes and Customs (CBIC) has notified the revised format for e-invoice under GST by replacing existing form and also increased the turnover threshold for businesses who have to generate e-invoice for B2B transactions.

With this, the e-invoice under Goods and Services Tax (GST) will be applicable for GST-registered businesses having turnover above Rs 500 crore with effect from October 1, 2020.

Also, SEZ units have been excluded from e-invoicing. (AGENCIES)

Previous articleIsrael, India conducting trials for 4 technologies with potential to detect COVID in about 30 secs

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